Best Tips for Good Bone Health

It’s a fact of life: As you age, your bones become thinner and lose their density. Over time, you become more prone to injury. Fortunately, you can take steps to halt the “thinning” of your bones, called osteopenia, and prevent osteoporosis. When it comes to bone health, there are two key nutrients: calcium and vitamin D. Calcium supports your bones and teeth structure, while vitamin D improves calcium absorption and bone growth.

These nutrients are important early in life, but they may also help as you age. If you develop osteoporosis, a disease characterized by brittle and breaking bones, getting plenty of calcium and vitamin D may slow the disease and prevent fractures.

Here are some of the BEST tips for good bone health

Drink Milk for Good Bone Health. Milk is considered as the foundation of healthy bones, and for good reason. We all know that milk is rich in calcium, but it’s perhaps the Vitamin D that’s as important. If you are not a fan of milk, here are some best ways to build strong bones without dairy.

Read More: 7 Surprising Dairy-Free Sources of Calcium

Check Your Vitamin D Levels. Vitamin D is essential for calcium absorption in the gut—without it, all the calcium you drink in milk gets wasted. Commercial milk and juice brands often fortify their milk with Vitamin D, as it is not present in high quantities initially. Vitamin D can be made naturally in our skin on exposure to sunlight, as well.

Eat Yogurt for Bone Health. Yogurt really needs to be a staple in your fridge. It is also a good source of both Calcium and Vitamin D. The National Osteoporosis Foundation strongly recommends 1000mg of Calcium for women under the age of fifty and men under age of the seventy. Above that age cutoff, the requirement goes up to 1200 mg. This goes hand in hand with a Vitamin D requirement of 400-800 IU per day.

Figs Promote Bone Health. Dried figs are one of the best sources of calcium. The human body requires around 1000mg of calcium per day to meet the daily requirement of the mineral. Most often, we fail to meet this requirement despite having milk, which is the richest source of calcium. For that reason, it is important to add some other foods rich in calcium into your diet for example Anjeer.

Read More: Health Benefits of Figs

Don’t Smoke, and Don’t Drink Excessively. Bad news for bad habits: Loss of bone mineral density is associated with tobacco use and excessive alcohol consumption, Dr. Sikon says. If you smoke, look into a program to help you quit. If you drink, stick to no more than one libation a day, she advises.

Read More: 10 Ways To Trick The Wish For Cigarettes

Cut Down Sodium for Good Bone Health. Eliminating the consumption of processed foods, or generally, any foods abundant in sodium, can go a long way to help your bones, and that’s because foods rich in sodium drain the calcium from your body when they bind to it in the kidneys, excreting it out as urine. Taking in too much salt literally, results in you flushing your precious calcium down the toilet. Keep that salt shaker off the table.

Exercise for Strong Bones. For long time exercise has considered as a way to maintain strong bone density. High-impact exercises, especially, go a long way in stimulating osteoblasts, the cells that build bone. High-impact sports include anything that involves lots of running, so most sports classify, especially squash, tennis, and basketball. If that’s obviously not your style than quick walking, or simply jumping rope, will be enough. Don’t discount resistance training (lifting weights). When you lift weights, you strain the tendons which are attached at one end to muscles, and the other end to the bone. This again stimulates your osteoblasts to work in hyper drive. An added bonus is that squats and other lower-body workouts stimulate the growth of stabilizer muscles, those muscles responsible for maintaining balance, so that will decrease your likelihood of a fall, which could have disastrous effects if you’re osteoporotic.

Read More: 5 Quick Exercises to Tone Your Body in Less Time

Salmon for Strong Bones. Salmon is known for having plenty of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, but a 3-ounce piece of sockeye salmon contains more than 100% of your vitamin D. So eat up for your heart and your bones.

Sources & References:
www.healthline.com
health.clevelandclinic.org
www.health.com
htv.com.pk

Healthy Food MasterGeneral Healthbone,Calcium,Vitamin D
It’s a fact of life: As you age, your bones become thinner and lose their density. Over time, you become more prone to injury. Fortunately, you can take steps to halt the “thinning” of your bones, called osteopenia, and prevent osteoporosis. When it comes to bone health, there are...
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