Without a doubt, the overall picture of citrus fruit is really good. However, there are several potential downsides.

High Amounts Could Cause Cavities

Consuming lots of whole citrus fruits or juices of citrus fruits may raise the risk of cavities. That’s simply because the acid in citrus fruits erodes tooth enamel. This is definitely a real risk if you sip on lemon water all day long, washing your teeth in acid. Surprisingly, certain compounds in citrus peels could combat the bacteria that trigger dental cavities. However, more research is necessary to see how that information could be used.

Fruit Juice Isn’t as Healthy as Whole Fruit

Even though orange and grapefruit juices possess lots of vitamin C and other nutrients usually found in whole citrus fruits, they’re not quite as healthy. That’s simply because a serving of juice provides significantly more sugar and much less fiber than a serving of whole fruit. There are actually a few explanations why that’s a problem. First of all, much more sugar per serving means more calories. Consuming fruit juice and other high-calorie drinks can cause you to add on weight. Next, when your body takes in large amounts of fructose ( the type of sugar in fruit juice ), it truly is quickly absorbed into your bloodstream and delivered to your liver. In case your liver gets more fructose than it can manage, it turns some of the excess fructose into fat. After a while, those fat deposits could cause fatty liver disease. Getting fructose from entire fruit is no problem, considering the fact that you’re getting a lesser amount at a time. Plus, the fiber present in fruit buffers the fructose, triggering it to be absorbed more gradually into your bloodstream.

Grapefruit Can Interact With Certain Medications

Consuming grapefruit or drinking grapefruit juice could be a problem if you take certain medications. There’s an enzyme in your gut that lessens the absorption of certain medications. Furanocoumarin, a chemical in grapefruit, binds to this enzyme and keeps it from doing work properly. For that reason, your body absorbs more medication than it’s supposed to. Furanocoumarin is furthermore present in tangelos and Seville oranges ( the kind used for marmalade ).

There are various prescription and over-the-counter drugs which are influenced by grapefruit, including:

• Several statins, for high cholesterol, such as Lipitor and Zocor.
• A few calcium channel blockers, for high blood pressure, like Plendil and Procardia.
• Cyclosporine, an immunosuppressant drug.
• Some Benzodiazepines, like Valium, Halcion and Versed.
• Other medications, such as Allegra, Zoloft, and Buspar.

Brief Summary: Even though citrus fruits are in general healthy, they might have some drawbacks. Their acid can destroy tooth enamel and grapefruit can interact with some medications.

Sources & References:
medlineplus.gov
www.karger.com
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
nutritiondata.self.com
ajcn.nutrition.org
www.lens.org
www.cmaj.ca
www.fda.gov
authoritynutrition.com

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Without a doubt, the overall picture of citrus fruit is really good. However, there are several potential downsides. High Amounts Could Cause Cavities Consuming lots of whole citrus fruits or juices of citrus fruits may raise the risk of cavities. That’s simply because the acid in citrus fruits erodes tooth enamel....
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