Whenever you exercise, you burn more calories simply because your working muscles need more fuel. Once you finish your workout, the body starts a process of recovery. The more vigorously you work out, the more time your body requires to recover. For the period of repair, your body continues to burn additional calories. According to the American Council on Exercise, your metabolic rate stays raised for up to 24 hours after you finish exercising. Seek advice from your healthcare provider before you start an exercise program.

Basal Metabolism

The number of calories that your body burns when you are completely at rest is called basal metabolic rate. For instance, as you age, your resting metabolism decreases. Because men have generally more muscle mass possess higher basal metabolic rates compared to women of the same weight. Typically, larger individuals have a higher rate than smaller men and women. The extra calories that you burn after an energetic exercise are higher than what you usually burn at rest.

Aerobic Exercise

Aerobic exercise, especially vigorous aerobic exercise, increases your calorie burn rate for several hours after you end your workout. Vigorous aerobic exercise raises your heart rate to around 80 % sub-maximal, not less than 20 minutes. “Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise” published a study that examined young male subjects who exercised vigorously on stationary bikes for 45 minutes. After finishing their workouts, their metabolisms increased by approximately 14 hours, and they burned about 190 additional calories above their resting metabolic levels.

Weight Training

A weight-lifting routine offers both short-term and long-term effects on your metabolism. When you lift heavy, free weights the effects are greatest. Once you finish an intense workout, your body tends to restore glycogen and other enzymes, like adenosine triphosphate, within your muscles. Additionally, the body is starting to repair damaged muscle tissue. For the reason that your workout has exhausted the energy-producing components from your muscles, the body must burn additional energy from the food you eat. As you create much more active muscle tissue from weight lifting, you also boost your resting metabolic rate.

High-intensity Interval Training (HIIT)

One of many ways HIIT helps you burn calories, in fact, comes after you are completed exercising. Various studies have shown HIIT’s amazing ability to boost your metabolic rate for a long time after exercise. Certain researchers have actually found that HIIT raises your metabolism after exercise way more than jogging and weight lifting. In the same study, HIIT was also discovered to shift the body’s metabolism toward using fat for energy instead of carbs. Yet another study revealed that just 2 minutes of HIIT in the form of sprints increased metabolism over 24 hrs as much as half an hour of running.

Sources & References:
www.livestrong.com
en.wikipedia.org
sportsmedicine-open.springeropen.com
www.nrcresearchpress.com
www.nrcresearchpress.com
sportsmedicine-open.springeropen.com
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

https://i2.wp.com/healthyfoodmaster.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/Your-Metabolic-Rate-Is-Higher-for-Hours-After-Exercise.jpg?fit=900%2C711https://i1.wp.com/healthyfoodmaster.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/Your-Metabolic-Rate-Is-Higher-for-Hours-After-Exercise.jpg?resize=150%2C150Healthy Food MasterBodybuilding & Fitnessfitness,weight loss,workout
Whenever you exercise, you burn more calories simply because your working muscles need more fuel. Once you finish your workout, the body starts a process of recovery. The more vigorously you work out, the more time your body requires to recover. For the period of repair, your body continues...
Sharing is caring!