How to Reduce Your Risk of Dementia

Dementia is a general term for symptoms linked to a decrease in mental capability which interferes with one’s daily life. These symptoms are difficulty in remembering, the person may also experience impairments in language, communication, focus, and reasoning. Alzheimer’s disease is most common cause of the group of symptoms known as dementia.

Some other causes include depression, thyroid gland problems, vascular changes, chronic infections, Parkinson’s disease and vitamin deficiency.

If the cause of dementia is not treatable, more brain cells are going to be damaged. This leads to constant worsening of the symptoms. But, if the trigger is treatable like for example in the case of thyroid problems, medications, and vitamin deficiencies, dementia is reversible. That’s why you have to visit a doctor to determine the culprit in dementia if you notice some of the warning signs.

Aside from genetic predisposition, other risk factors for dementia include psychological, environmental, and lifestyle factors. Thankfully, you can do something to prevent developing dementia and protect your brain’s health.

7 Ways to Lower the Risk of Dementia

1. Be Physically Active
Regular exercise will make your heart and blood circulatory system stronger. Physical activity can prevent almost all chronic health problems, and this includes even half an hour of walking, gardening, or biking.

So, in case you’re not a lover of intense workout routine, you can definitely take half an hour of your time to accomplish some of these moderate activities. What’s more, connecting with nature has been shown to be far better in reducing weight and blood pressure than an indoor workout.

2. Control Alcohol Intake
Consuming too much alcohol can result in raised blood pressure, as well as raising the level of cholesterol in your blood. Remain faithful to the recommended limits for alcohol consumption to decrease your risk of high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, and dementia.

The recommended daily limit for alcohol consumption is 3 to 4 units of alcohol daily for men and 2 to 3 units daily for ladies. One alcohol unit is measured as 10ml or 8g of pure alcohol. This equals one 25ml single measure of whiskey (ABV 40%), or a third of a pint of beer (ABV 5-6%) or half a standard (175ml) glass of red wine (ABV 12%).

3. Don’t smoke
If you are a smoker, try to stop. By smoking, you are at a larger risk of developing dementia and damaging your lungs, heart, and circulation. If you would like to stop smoking, consult your GP. They can provide help and advice about stopping, and can suggest you to an NHS Stop Smoking Service.

4. Eat a Healthy Balanced Diet
A low-fat, high-fibre diet plan including lots of fresh vegetables and fruits and whole grains can help lessen your risk of certain kinds of dementia. Reducing the amount of salt in your daily diet to no more than six grams can also help. An excessive amount salt increases your blood pressure, which puts you at risk of formulating certain types of dementia. High cholesterol levels can also stick you at risk of developing some kinds of dementia, make sure to minimize the amount of food you eat which is high in saturated fat.

5. Try Something New to Challenge Your Brain Every Day
In case you give your brain a new task each day, you will hold off the onset of dementia. For example doing word puzzles, crosswords, and trying to learn a new language.

Research has shown that grown-ups who are bilingual have delayed symptoms of dementia by 5 years compared to people who speak only one language. On the other hand, doing crossword puzzles each day was proven to daily the beginning of memory decrease by 2,5 years.

6. Protect Your Brain
Take care of your head and brain by putting on a helmet when riding a bike. Be very careful if you’ve ever suffered from a concussion to protect your brain from further damage.

7. Control Your Weight
Excess weight can boost your blood pressure, which raises your risk of getting certain types of dementia. The danger is larger if you are obese. The most scientific way to measure your weight is to calculate your body mass index (BMI).

You can calculate your Body Mass Index (BMI) using the BMI healthy weight calculator. Those with Body Mass Index f 25-30 are overweight, while those with a BMI above 30 are obese. Individuals with Body Mass Index (BMI) of 40 or even more are morbidly obese.

Sources & References:
healthnbeautymagazine.com
www.alzheimers.org.uk
www.nhs.uk

Healthy Food MasterGeneral HealthNatural Medicinealzheimer’s disease,blood pressure,blood sugar,brain,healthy diet,weight loss,workout
Dementia is a general term for symptoms linked to a decrease in mental capability which interferes with one’s daily life. These symptoms are difficulty in remembering, the person may also experience impairments in language, communication, focus, and reasoning. Alzheimer’s disease is most common cause of the group of symptoms...
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