10 Factors That Might Be Contributing To Your Constipation

image source: Pixabay

Constipation happens when the colon absorbs too much water. This can occur if the muscles in the colon are contracting slowly or poorly, causing the stool to move too slowly and lose more water.

Here are several factors that might be contributing to your constipation:

1. Lack of Fiber

Dietary fiber isn’t digested by your body, but instead travels relatively intact through the stomach and intestines, absorbing water to add bulk to stool, and helping move waste through your system.

2. Poor Diet

Diets high in processed foods, sugar, refined carbohydrates, alcohol, unhealthy fats and synthetic additives can make it harder to produce normal bowel movements.

3. Not Going To The Toilet When Needed

If individuals ignore the urge to have a bowel movement, the urge can gradually go away until the individual no longer feels the need to go. The longer it is delayed, the drier and harder the stool will become.

4. Antidepressants

Constipation can be associated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants such as Prozac (fluoxetine). However, constipation is more of a problem with older tricyclic antidepressants such as Elavil (amitriptyline), says Dr. Park. Why any of these drugs have this effect isn’t clear, though. If you’re taking an antidepressant and have this side effect, think about using a gentle stool softener.

5. Inactivity

Exercise helps to increase blood flow, strengthens muscles within the digestive tract and helps control stress.

6. Chocolate

Not the best news for those with a sweet tooth: Chocolate can be constipating, although the effect appears to vary from person to person. In a recent survey done by the Rome Committee on Functional Bowel Disorders, 70 percent of people with recurring constipation reported that chocolate was a major offender. There’s no way to tell if chocolate is contributing to your constipation problem unless you completely eliminate it from your diet for a period of time. Start with two weeks and if your constipation improves then make sure to limit the sweet stuff to special occasions.

7. Pregnancy

Constipation is common during pregnancy. At least two in five women experience constipation when they’re pregnant. This is caused by the body producing more of the hormone progesterone, which might make it more difficult for intestinal muscles to contract. If you’re pregnant, ask your doctor about ways to safely treat constipation without harming your baby.

8. Hypothyroidism and Hashimoto’s

Hypothyroidism, an underactive thyroid, slows down many of the body’s systems, including elimination. For your body to eliminate waste, your colon must contract, and slow or weak colon contractions can be a symptom of hypothyroidism. It’s estimated that 27 million American have an underactive thyroid and most have no idea that they do.

9. Aging

As a person gets older, the metabolism slows down, resulting in less intestinal activity. The muscles in the digestive tract do not work as well as they used to.

10 Magnesium Deficiency

Magnesium is an electrolyte that helps with normal muscle functioning. Too little magnesium in your diet can contribute to muscle tension and also worsen symptoms of emotional stress.

Sources & References:
draxe.com
www.amymyersmd.com
www.medicalnewstoday.com
www.healthline.com

Healthy Food MasterGeneral Healthconstipation,fiber,Magnesium
image source: Pixabay Constipation happens when the colon absorbs too much water. This can occur if the muscles in the colon are contracting slowly or poorly, causing the stool to move too slowly and lose more water. Here are several factors that might be contributing to your constipation: 1. Lack of Fiber Dietary fiber...
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