Nowadays, people have become more and more aware of their need to maintain a healthier lifestyle. This often means consciously making great choices during the course of the day. When it comes to nutrition, much has been said on the subject, from mere hearsay to evidence-based research. Differentiating between the two can sometimes pose a challenge. So here are seven food facts for you, backed by research, many of which have been traditionally known in different cultures but only recently validated by science.

1. Some Fats are Good

While saturated and trans fats should be limited or avoided, unsaturated fats (polyunsaturated or monounsaturated) contain important fatty acids that help lower “bad” LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol while increasing “good” HDL (high-density lipoprotein) cholesterol. One way to include good fat in your diet is to use canola oil for cooking. It has the least amount of saturated fat compared to other commonly used oils, making it ideal for a range of uses from salads to sautéing.

2. Edible Seeds are Nutritious

Eating just one tablespoon of chia seeds will give you 19 percent of your recommended daily fiber intake in addition to calcium, magnesium, iron, essential fatty acids and antioxidants. Flaxseeds are rich in omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, vitamins B1, B2 and B6, and other nutrients that help boost your energy and benefit your nervous system, immune system, and blood. Pumpkin seeds, usually roasted before eating, are a great source of zinc, copper, and selenium. Eating two tablespoons of pumpkin seeds will give you about 25% of magnesium, a mineral that plays a key role in about 300 metabolic reactions in the body.

3. Proteins are Building Blocks

Proteins are an important part of every cell in the human body and play a vital role in the formation and repair of cells. For this reason, you need to ensure that 10 to 35 percent of your daily calorie needs are met by protein. For example, the average 60-kilogram Indian male needs 60 grams of protein (25 percent) and the average 55-kilogram female needs 55 grams. Eggs, lean meat, beans, dairy, nuts, and lentils are good protein sources.

4. Eat Five Vegetables and Fruits a Day

We have evidence to show that you need to include five daily portions of vegetables and fruits combined together. Five portions equate to about 400 grams a day. From everyday problems like constipation and indigestion to the more serious conditions such as heart disease and cancer, fruits and vegetables go a long way in helping lower your risk.

5. Nuts Provide Healthy Fat and Energy

Nuts are rich in unsaturated “good” fats. Additionally, walnuts, peanuts, and almonds are rich in fiber that helps digestion, plus walnuts are rich in omega-3 fat. Keep in mind though that nuts are high in calories (10 almonds will give you 85 calories while 10 cashews add 95 calories), so it is important to eat them in moderation. An ounce or a handful of nuts is around 160 cal with 6gm of protein and 3g of fiber, which makes it an ideal choice for snacks.

6. Eat Small Portion Sizes

It’s hard to avoid oversized portions, especially when eating at restaurants, which usually results in overeating. The amount you eat plays a role in how much energy you have. Figure out the proper portion sizes for you. If you are an overeater, be aware of what triggers you to ignore choosing reasonable portion amounts.

Sources & References:
food.ndtv.com
www.unitypoint.org

https://i2.wp.com/healthyfoodmaster.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/6-Food-Facts-You-Need-to-Know-to-Stay-Healthy.jpg?fit=900%2C591&ssl=1https://i1.wp.com/healthyfoodmaster.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/6-Food-Facts-You-Need-to-Know-to-Stay-Healthy.jpg?resize=150%2C150&ssl=1Healthy Food MasterGeneral HealthEnergy,fiber,healthy diet,Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Nowadays, people have become more and more aware of their need to maintain a healthier lifestyle. This often means consciously making great choices during the course of the day. When it comes to nutrition, much has been said on the subject, from mere hearsay to evidence-based research. Differentiating between...
Sharing is caring!