Results from studies that have compared the nutrient content of frozen and fresh produce vary slightly. This is because some studies use freshly harvested produce, which removes the effects of storage and transport time, while others use produce from supermarkets.

Additionally, differences in processing and measuring methods can influence results.

However, in general, the evidence suggests that freezing can preserve nutrient value and that the nutritional content of fresh and frozen produce is similar.

When studies do report nutrient decreases in some frozen produce, they are generally small.

Furthermore, levels of vitamin A, carotenoids, vitamin E, minerals, and fiber are similar in fresh and frozen produce. They’re generally not affected by blanching.

Studies comparing supermarket produce with frozen varieties — such as peas, green beans, carrots, spinach, and broccoli — found the antioxidant activity and nutrient content to be similar.

Bottom Line:

Frozen produce is nutritionally similar to fresh produce. When nutrient decreases are reported in frozen produce, they’re generally small.

Sources & References:
onlinelibrary.wiley.com
www.mdpi.com
pubs.acs.org
europepmc.org

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Results from studies that have compared the nutrient content of frozen and fresh produce vary slightly. This is because some studies use freshly harvested produce, which removes the effects of storage and transport time, while others use produce from supermarkets. Additionally, differences in processing and measuring methods can influence results. However,...
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