Here-Are-Some-Examples-of-Balanced-Pre-Workout Meals

Photo by Sylwia Bartyzel on Unsplash

Not eating enough before a workout can make you dizzy, lightheaded, nauseated, or lethargic. It can also make you more likely to injure yourself. And even if none of these things happens, skipping food can negatively impact your performance and reduce your gains.

Which foods and how much to eat depends on the type, duration, and intensity of the workout. In every meal, you need to consider the three macronutrients: carbohydrates, protein, and fats. If you eat fat with your pre-workout meal, then it should be consumed at least a few hours before your workout.

Here are some examples of balanced pre-workout meals:

If Your Workout Starts Within 2–3 Hours or More

→ Sandwich on whole-grain bread, lean protein, and a side salad
→ Egg omelet and whole-grain toast topped with avocado spread and a cup of fruit
→ Lean protein, brown rice, and roasted vegetables

If Your Workout Starts Within 2 Hours

→ Protein smoothie made with milk, protein powder, banana and mixed berries
→ Whole-grain cereal and milk
→ A cup of oatmeal topped with banana and sliced almonds
→ Natural almond butter and fruit preserve sandwich on whole-grain bread

If Your Workout Starts Within an Hour or Less

→ Greek yogurt and fruit
→ Nutrition bar with protein and wholesome ingredients
→ A piece of fruit, such as a banana, orange or apple

Keep in mind that you don’t need to eat many pre-workout meals at different times. Just choose one of these. For best results, experiment with different timings and nutrient compositions.

Brief Summary

A combination of carbs and protein is recommended for pre-workout meals. Fat can also be beneficial, but it should be consumed at least two hours before exercise.

Sources & References:
www.healthline.com
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
www.myprotein.com
www.self.com

Healthy Food MasterBodybuilding & FitnessDiet & Weight Lossexercises,meals,pre-workout
Photo by Sylwia Bartyzel on Unsplash Not eating enough before a workout can make you dizzy, lightheaded, nauseated, or lethargic. It can also make you more likely to injure yourself. And even if none of these things happens, skipping food can negatively impact your performance and reduce your gains. Which foods and how much...
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