Here's What Could Possibly Happen If You Eat A Bad Egg

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No one can argue the fact that eggs are cheap and one of the best sources of protein. You can find them literally anywhere at health food stores, supermarkets, and even gas stations. What you should keep in mind is that eggs come with an expiration date; in fact, every egg carton comes with a use-by date. Make sure you only consume good eggs to avoid dealing with a food-borne illness.

There are two ways eggs can make you sick. Eggs can either spoil or become contaminated with a food-borne illness. Rotten eggs usually have a dank smell and unusual color or texture, but it is difficult to detect a contaminated egg. If you feel sick to your stomach, have a fever, or experience diarrhea and vomiting within 12 to 72 hours of eating them, you may have come in contact with bad eggs.

Salmonella

The most common food-borne illness to affect eggs is salmonella. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 40,000 cases of salmonella are reported every year in the United States, and children are at greater risk than adults. The salmonella germ can get into the egg through cracks in the shell, where it multiplies and produces a toxin that gives you symptoms resembling stomach flu: fever, diarrhea, vomiting and stomach cramps that start within one to three days of eating the contaminated food. The symptoms usually last less than a week and go away on their own, but some people get so sick they have to be hospitalized.

Spoilage

Both raw and cooked eggs can go bad. Keep raw eggs refrigerated at all times, and check the expiration date on the package. When you crack the egg, if it has a strong smell or if the white has taken on a blue-green color, toss it out. Tiny red specks on the yolk and cloudy-white yolks are both safe to eat. Once you boil eggs, eat them within seven days or throw them out. If you detect a strong smell from the boiled egg when you crack it, don’t eat it. Don’t keep cooked egg dishes like strata, custard or quiche in the refrigerator for more than a day before eating or throwing them away.

Treatment

Knowing what happens if you eat a bad egg helps decide if you need medical attention or not. It is usually better to talk to your doctor if your symptoms are severe. Most people usually feel better by keeping them hydrated. You should sip water to replace lost electrolytes and fluids through diarrhea or vomiting. It may also help to take OTC medication to treat diarrhea or your upset stomach.

Quick Tips for Staying on the Safe Side

Buy eggs that are sold in refrigerated cases.
Store your eggs in their carton in the refrigerator at 40-degrees F or below.
Don’t wash your eggs until you’re ready to prepare them.
Toss out cracked eggs. Bacteria can sneak through cracks.
Leave hard-boiled eggs in the fridge in their shells. Don’t peel the eggs until you’re ready to eat them.

Sources & References:
www.livestrong.com
www.newhealthadvisor.com

Healthy Food MasterGeneral Healthfood-borne illness,health,healthy diet,protein
Photo by Hello I'm Nik on Unsplash No one can argue the fact that eggs are cheap and one of the best sources of protein. You can find them literally anywhere at health food stores, supermarkets, and even gas stations. What you should keep in mind is that eggs come with an expiration...
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