Taking These 5 Vitamins May Help Ease Your Constipation

Constipation is an uncomfortable and inconvenient problem for millions of people. According to the Mayo Clinic, it happens when you have infrequent bowel movements or trouble passing stool. If you have fewer than three bowel movements per week, you probably have constipation. Although constipation is usually associated with lack of physical activities and not eating enough fiber-rich foods or drinking sufficient amount of water, deficiency of certain vitamins are also found to be responsible for this condition. Vitamins that play a role in maintaining the motility of intestinal muscles can help in easing bowel movement. Furthermore, certain vitamins act as laxatives. Hence, to restore regularity you may rely on certain vitamins. However, vitamin remedies for constipation are recommended only for people who are otherwise healthy. Consult your physician if you believe you are suffering from constipation to determine the right treatment for you.

Taking these vitamins may help ease your constipation.

1. Vitamin C

Vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin. Unabsorbed vitamin C has an osmotic effect in your digestive tract. That means it pulls water into your intestines, which can help soften your stool. Too much vitamin C can be harmful, however. It can cause diarrhea, nausea, and stomach cramps. It can also cause some people to absorb too much iron from their food. Among other side effects, this may make your constipation worse.

According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the upper limit of vitamin C that most adults can tolerate is 2,000 milligrams (mg). The upper limit for children under the age of 18 is 400 to 1,800 mg, depending on their age. The recommended daily dosage is much lower.

2. Vitamin B-5

Vitamin B5, also called pantothenic acid, is a naturally occurring vitamin that is essential for many different processes throughout your body and may be an effective treatment for constipation. When taken in very large amounts and on an empty stomach, pantothenic acid can cause diarrhea by softening your stools, which can relieve constipation. As a result, vitamin B5 is a common ingredient in many over-the-counter and prescription nutritional laxatives.

According to the NIH, the recommended daily intake for most adults is 5 mg of vitamin B-5 per day. Most breastfeeding women should get 7 mg daily. Children under 18 should generally get between 1.7 and 5 mg daily, depending on their age.

3. Folic Acid

You may become constipated when the folic acid or vitamin B9 level in your blood is low. Vitamin B9 is involved in synthesis of digestive acids that apart from promoting digestion helps in maintaining the normal movement of stool. Studies have shown that taking a high dose folic acid supplement helps in providing relief from constipation.

When possible, aim to eat folate-rich foods instead of taking a folic acid supplement. Folate-rich foods are often fiber-rich too, which may also help get your bowels moving. Folate-rich foods include:

spinach
• black-eyed peas
• breakfast cereals
• fortified rice

Most people get plenty of folic acid from their daily diet. You may also want to take a supplement. According to the NIH, the upper limit that most adults can tolerate is 1,000 micrograms (mcg) of folic acid per day. Most children between the ages of 1 and 18 can take up to 300 to 800 mcg daily, depending on their age.

4. Vitamin B-12

Vitamin B-12 deficiency can cause constipation. If your constipation is caused by low levels of B-12, increasing your daily intake of this nutrient may help ease your symptoms. You may prefer to eat more B-12-rich foods rather than take a supplement. Examples of foods rich in B-12 include:

• beef liver
• trout
• salmon
• tuna fish

The NIH advises most adults to get 2.4 mcg of vitamin B-12 per day. Children under 18 can take between 0.4 and 1.8 mcg, depending on their age.

5. Vitamin B-1

Vitamin B-1, or thiamine, aids in digestion. When your levels of thiamine are low, your digestion may be slowed. This may lead to constipation. Most women should consume 1.1 mg of thiamine daily, reports the NIH. Most men should consume 1.2 mg per day. Children between the ages of 1 and 18 should get between 0.5 and 1 mg, depending on their age.

Sources & References:
www.healthline.com
www.natural-homeremedies.org
www.livestrong.com

Healthy Food MasterGeneral Healthconstipation
Constipation is an uncomfortable and inconvenient problem for millions of people. According to the Mayo Clinic, it happens when you have infrequent bowel movements or trouble passing stool. If you have fewer than three bowel movements per week, you probably have constipation. Although constipation is usually associated with lack...
Sharing is caring!