The Truth About Fats: Monounsaturated Fat & Polyunsaturated Fat

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Generally speaking, Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats don’t deserve the bad reputation of fat. Both types are actually a healthy part of your diet and should make up the majority of the fat you eat each day. Except for being nutritious, monounsaturated and, polyunsaturated fats offer protective benefits that might reduce your risk of certain illnesses and diseases.

Monounsaturated Fat

Monounsaturated fats can help lower your cholesterol levels when you eat them in place of saturated or trans fats, which are found in foods like butter, baked goods, and fried fast foods. Nutritious monounsaturated fats can also keep your heart rhythm normal and reduce inflammation, a condition that can increase your risk of certain types of cancer. Eating monounsaturated fats helps regulate your insulin and blood sugar levels, which is beneficial for everyone, but can be particularly helpful for people with diabetes.

Which foods contain monounsaturated fats?

Most foods contain a combination of different fats. Examples of foods high in monounsaturated fats include plant-based liquid oils such as:

olive oil,
canola oil,
peanut oil,
safflower oil and
sesame oil.

Other sources include avocados, peanut butter, hazelnuts, pecans, pumpkin seeds and sesame seeds.

Polyunsaturated Fat

Polyunsaturated fats, like monounsaturated fats, help lower your bad cholesterol level when you eat them instead of saturated or trans fats. They might also boost your good cholesterol level, which can reduce your risk of heart disease. A specific kind of polyunsaturated fat, called omega-3 fatty acids, is particularly beneficial to your heart by protecting you against high blood pressure. This unsaturated fat might also reduce your risk of Type 2 diabetes.

Which foods are high in polyunsaturated fats?

Most foods contain a combination of fats. Foods high in polyunsaturated fat include a number of plant-based oils, including:

soybean oil.
corn oil.
sunflower oil.

Other sources include some nuts and seeds such as walnuts and sunflower seeds, tofu and soybeans. The American Heart Association also recommends eating tofu and other forms of soybeans, canola, walnut and flaxseed, and their oils. These foods contain alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), another omega-3 fatty acid.

Sources & References:
healthyeating.sfgate.com
healthyforgood.heart.org/monounsaturated
healthyforgood.heart.org/polyunsaturated

Healthy Food MasterGeneral Healthhealth,healthy diet,monounsaturated fat,Omega-3 Fatty Acids,polyunsaturated fat
Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash Generally speaking, Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats don't deserve the bad reputation of fat. Both types are actually a healthy part of your diet and should make up the majority of the fat you eat each day. Except for being nutritious, monounsaturated and, polyunsaturated fats offer protective benefits that...
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