Diets rich in vegetables have been linked to a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. This may be due to their high fiber content. Fiber is thought to help reduce blood sugar levels and improve insulin sensitivity, both of which may reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Vegetables also contain large amounts of antioxidants and beneficial plant compounds. These are thought to reduce the type of oxidative stress that could prevent sugar from properly entering the cells. Several large reviews, including a total of over 400,000 people and spanning over 4 to 23 years, have been done on this topic.

Most link each additional 3.8 ounces (106 grams) of vegetables eaten per day to a 2 to 14% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Moreover, a recent review reported the largest effects following intakes of 7.5–11 ounces (212–318 grams) of vegetables per day with no additional benefits for larger portions.

Interestingly, one review compared the risk of developing diabetes among people who ate the most and those who ate the least of certain specific types of vegetables.

They concluded that those who ate the most cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli, cabbage, kale, and cauliflower could benefit from a 7% lower risk of type 2 diabetes.

In comparison, those who ate the most yellow vegetables had up to an 18% lower risk, while those who ate the most leafy greens had up to a 28% lower risk.

Yet, studies on this topic are largely observational, making it difficult to conclude that the vegetables are actually the cause the reduced type 2 diabetes risk.

Brief Summary

Eating more vegetables may help lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, though most studies are observational. Leafy greens appear most effective.

Sources & References:
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
europepmc.org
linkinghub.elsevier.com
www.healthline.com

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Diets rich in vegetables have been linked to a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. This may be due to their high fiber content. Fiber is thought to help reduce blood sugar levels and improve insulin sensitivity, both of which may reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Vegetables...
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