Fat-Soluble Vitamins

Photo by Char Beck on Unsplash

Fat-soluble vitamins are essential for so many biological processes. In fact, you couldn’t survive without them. Unlike the water-soluble vitamins, your body stores the fat-soluble vitamins in the liver and fat cells.

There are four types of fat-soluble vitamins:

→ vitamin A
→ vitamin D
→ vitamin E
→ vitamin K

The fat-soluble vitamins, A, D, E, and K, are stored in the body for long periods of time and generally pose a greater risk for toxicity when consumed in excess than water-soluble vitamins. Eating a normal, well-balanced diet will not lead to toxicity in otherwise healthy individuals. However, taking vitamin supplements that contain megadoses of vitamins A, D, E and K may lead to toxicity. The body only needs small amounts of any vitamin.

While diseases caused by a lack of fat-soluble vitamins are rare in the United States, symptoms of mild deficiency can develop without adequate amounts of vitamins in the diet. Additionally, some health problems may decrease the absorption of fat, and in turn, decrease the absorption of vitamins A, D, E and K. Consult a medical professional about any potential health problems that may interfere with vitamin absorption.

Vitamin A

Is also known as Retinol and has several important functions including strengthening immunity against infections, helping vision in dim light, and is involved in keeping skin and the linings of some parts of the body, such as the nose, healthy.

Dietary sources — Vitamin A can be obtained through natural sources. Some sources include:

• fish liver oil
• fliver of animals
• butter

Animal sources provide the active components to help create retinols within the human body.

Some plants also provide pro-vitamin A compounds known as carotenoid antioxidants. The most common is called beta-carotene, which can be found in foods such as:

• kale
• carrots
• spinach

Learn More About Vitamin A

Health Benefits of Vitamin A
Vitamin A Rich Foods You Should Include in Your Diet

Vitamin D

Helps regulate the amount of calcium and phosphate in the body which in turn are needed to keep bones and teeth healthy.

Dietary sources — Vitamin D absorption is one of the only arguments for a person exposing large, unprotected areas of skin to the sun. When exposed regularly, people can actually absorb enough rays to produce vitamin D to function properly, without need for supplements.

However, many people do not spend hours in the sun. When people do, they are also often covered in sunscreen and clothing. As a result, a person is not likely to absorb as much vitamin D through sunlight alone.

Instead, people can obtain vitamin D through some food sources, including:

• fish oil
• fatty fish
• mushrooms exposed to ultraviolet light
• fortified dairy products

Learn More About Vitamin D

Some Common Diseases Linked to Vitamin D Deficiency

Vitamin E

Helps to maintain cell structure by protecting cell membranes.

Dietary sources — Vitamin E is most abundant in seeds, vegetable oils, and nuts. Some of the best sources of vitamin E include:

• wheat germ oil
• sunflower seeds or oil
• hazelnuts
• almonds

Learn More About Vitamin E

Vitamin E Benefits, Side Effects, Vitamin E Deficiency and Foods
10 Foods High in Vitamin E

Vitamin K

Is needed for blood clotting, which means it helps wounds heal properly. There is increasing evidence that vitamin K is also needed to help build strong bones.

Dietary sources — Vitamin K-1 and K-2 are found in a variety of sources. Some of these sources include:

• kale
• liver
• spinach
• parsley
• butter
• egg yolks

Learn More About Vitamin K

Vitamin K Benefits – Essential to building strong bones, preventing heart disease and more!
The Best Way To Get Vitamin K In Our Bodies Naturally

Sources & References:
www.medicalnewstoday.com
www.justvitamins.co.uk
extension.colostate.edu

Healthy Food MasterGeneral Healthblood clotting,bones,health,healthy eyesight,teeth,vitamin A,Vitamin D,Vitamin E,Vitamin K
Photo by Char Beck on Unsplash Fat-soluble vitamins are essential for so many biological processes. In fact, you couldn't survive without them. Unlike the water-soluble vitamins, your body stores the fat-soluble vitamins in the liver and fat cells. There are four types of fat-soluble vitamins: → vitamin A → vitamin D → vitamin E → vitamin K The fat-soluble...
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