What Are Water-Soluble Vitamins and What They Do

Photo by Jamie Street on Unsplash

Water-soluble vitamins dissolve in water and are not stored by the body. It absorbs what it needs and then it usually excretes the excess in your urine. Due to the fact that they cannot be stored, the body needs a continuous supply through a steady daily intake. This can be through the foods we eat, the supplements we take, or from a combination of both. Water-soluble vitamins are found in fruits, vegetables, grains, animal-based foods such as fish, beef, chicken, eggs, and milk.

Water-soluble vitamins are easily destroyed or washed out during food storage or preparation. Proper storage and preparation of food can minimize vitamin loss. To reduce vitamin loss, always refrigerate fresh produce, keep milk and grains away from strong light, and use cooking water from vegetables to prepare soups.

Water-soluble Vitamins Are:

Vitamin C
• the B Vitamins
→Thiamin (Vitamin B1)
→Riboflavin (Vitamin B2)
→Niacin (Vitamin B3)
→Pantothenic Acid (vitamin B5)
Vitamin B6
→Folic Acid (folate, vitamin B9)
Vitamin B12
→Biotin (vitamin B7)

What They Do

Although water-soluble vitamins have many tasks in the body, one of the most important is helping to free the energy found in the food you eat. Others help keep tissues healthy. Here are some examples of how different vitamins help you maintain health:

Release energy. Several B vitamins are key components of certain coenzymes (molecules that aid enzymes) that help release energy from food.

Produce energy. Thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, and biotin engage in energy production.

Build proteins and cells. Vitamins B6, B12, and folic acid metabolize amino acids (the building blocks of proteins) and help cells multiply.

Make collagen. One of many roles played by vitamin C is to help make collagen, which knits together wounds, supports blood vessel walls, and forms a base for teeth and bones.

Safety of Dosages

Because your body easily excretes excess water-soluble vitamins, you are unlikely to get harmful doses of vitamins B and C from good food sources. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration notes, however, that vitamin supplements are more likely to cause problems at high dosages. Too much vitamin C can create digestive illness, and vitamin B-6 may cause reversible nerve damage.

Sources & References:
www.helpguide.org
www.justvitamins.co.uk
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
www.livestrong.com

Healthy Food MasterGeneral HealthB vitamins,Energy,health,vitamin C
Photo by Jamie Street on Unsplash Water-soluble vitamins dissolve in water and are not stored by the body. It absorbs what it needs and then it usually excretes the excess in your urine. Due to the fact that they cannot be stored, the body needs a continuous supply through a steady daily intake....
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