What Happens If You Take Whey Protein Without Working Out

Photo by Edward Boulton on Unsplash

Whey protein a natural byproduct of cow’s milk, which is turned into a versatile powder form. It is one of the most popular fitness supplements available on the market. There’s nothing inherently risky about whey protein by itself, but following a diet that’s very high in protein for an extended period of time entails risks, especially if you are not trying to working out. Athletes need more protein than people who aren’t active, so if you aren’t putting in your time at the gym, drinking whey protein shakes every day may cause weight gain and other health issues. Before making whey a regular part of your eating plan, get the go-ahead from your doctor.

Protein Requirements

Many people drink whey to supplement their normal protein intake, whether they exercise or not. But the vast majority of Americans don’t need extra protein. According to the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, most people in America take in more than double the amount of protein their bodies need. Researchers at Rice University state that a sedentary adult needs only about 0.4 grams of protein per pound of body weight, while an athlete with a goal of building muscle mass can safely consume 0.6 to 0.9 grams per pound. For a 150-pound person, that’s a difference of 75 grams of protein — 60 for a sedentary adult and 135 for an active, muscle-building adult.

Weight Gain

For bodybuilders and athletes, protein shakes are designed to help build muscle. According to the National Strength and Conditioning Association, consuming a protein and carbohydrate snack or meal within 30 minutes after a workout aids protein synthesis and decreases muscle breakdown. If you don’t work out, however, your muscles aren’t likely to be challenged enough to need that extra protein. Protein contains calories — the same as carbohydrates — and eating too many calories leads to weight gain. If your body can’t use the extra calories in protein to aid muscle growth, it stores them as fat.

Extra Calories

Protein shakes aren’t 100 percent protein. Depending on the brand, they may contain many other ingredients to add extra nutrition, and flavoring and sweetness to make them palatable. Those additions can also add calories. A typical whey protein shake contains about 110 calories if you mix it with 1 cup of water. If you mix it with milk or throw in a banana, that number jumps to about 300 calories. Over time, those calories can add up to weight gain, and it’s likely to be in the form of fat rather than muscle if you’re not regularly exercising.

Lower-Quality Nutrition

Protein shakes are dietary supplements and typically are produced with isolated nutrients rather than whole foods. If you’re supplementing a healthy, well-rounded diet and fitness plan, that may not matter, but if you’re replacing regular meals with protein shakes, you may be missing out on valuable nutrients. According to the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center website, dietary supplements like protein shakes are unable to successfully reproduce the phytonutrients, antioxidants, fiber and other protective substances that whole foods naturally contain. Many brands of protein shakes contain other substances that aren’t good for you, including artificial flavors and sugars. For that reason, it’s a healthier choice to eat natural, high-protein foods instead of drinking shakes.

Kidney Strain

Kidneys’ main task is metabolizing excess protein. When you eat more than you need, the process of metabolism is slowing down. Your kidneys strain to process protein and fail to do it properly. As a result, you may end up having a lot of health problems ranging from kidney stones to cancer. Thus, before you add whey protein shakes or planning to make any radical change in your diet, you should consult your doctor. No need to turn your desire to build muscle mass into a one-way ticket to a hospital room.

Sources & References:
www.projectswole.com
www.livestrong.com
healthyeating.sfgate.com

Healthy Food MasterGeneral Healthfitness,health,protein,whey protein,workout
Photo by Edward Boulton on Unsplash Whey protein a natural byproduct of cow’s milk, which is turned into a versatile powder form. It is one of the most popular fitness supplements available on the market. There’s nothing inherently risky about whey protein by itself, but following a diet that’s very high in protein...
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