What Quantity Of Each Vitamin is Required Every Day

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There are 13 essential vitamins your body needs. Those are A, C, D, E, K and the B vitamins: thiamine (B1), riboflavin (B2), niacin (B3), pantothenic acid (B5), pyroxidine (B6), biotin (B7), folate (B9) and cobalamin (B12). Recommended Dietary Allowances, or RDAs, represent the average daily dietary intake of each vitamin a person needs to stay healthy and steer clear of deficiencies. The values, which are all backed by scientific data, are broken down.

1. Vitamin A

The amount of vitamin A you need depends on your age and reproductive status. Recommended intakes for vitamin A for people aged 14 years and older range between 700 and 900 micrograms (mcg) of retinol activity equivalents (RAE) per day. Recommended intakes for women who are nursing range between 1,200 and 1,300 RAE. Lower values are recommended for infants and children younger than 14.

Where to get Vitamin A: Salmon, other cold-water fish, egg yolks, fortified dairy products.

2. Vitamin D

Vitamin D intake is recommended at 400–800 IU/day, or 10–20 micrograms. Infants 0-12 months – 400 IU (10 mcg); Children 1-18 years – 600 IU (15 mcg); Adults to age 70 – 600 IU (15 mcg); Adults over 70 – 800 IU (20 mcg); Pregnant or lactating women – 600 IU (15 mcg). However, some studies suggest that a higher daily intake of 1000–4000 IU (25–100 micrograms) is needed to maintain optimal blood levels.

Where to get Vitamin D: Fortified milk, fortified soy/rice beverages, butter, egg yolks, fatty fish, fish-liver oil; made by the body when exposed to the sun.

3. Vitamin E

According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the U.S. Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) for adults older than 14-years is 15 mg (or 22.4 IU); pregnant women of any age should get 15 mg (or 22.4 IU); and breastfeeding women of any age should take 19 mg (or 28.4 IU).

Where to get Vitamin E: Eggs, vegetable oils, margarine, mayonnaise; nuts, seeds, fortified cereals.

4. Vitamin K

The recommended adequate intake for vitamin K depends on age and gender. Women aged 19 years and over should consume 90 micrograms (mcg) a day, and men should have 120 mcg.

Where to get Vitamin K: spinach, broccoli, green leafy vegetables, liver.

5. Vitamin C

If you take vitamin C for its antioxidant properties, keep in mind that the supplement might not offer the same benefits as naturally occurring antioxidants in food. The recommended daily amount of vitamin C for adult men is 90 milligrams and for adult women is 75 milligrams.

Where to get Vitamin C: Citrus fruits, juices, melons, berries, peppers, broccoli, potatoes.

6. Thiamine (Vitamin B1)

In the U.S., the recommended daily allowance (RDA) of thiamin taken by mouth is 1.2 mg for males and 1.1 mg for females over the age of 18 years. Pregnant or breastfeeding women of any age should consume 1.4 mg each day.

Where to get Vitamin B1: Pork, legumes, nuts, seeds, fortified cereals, grains.

7. Riboflavin (Vitamin B2)

ADULTS: The normal recommended daily allowance (RDA) of riboflavin is dependent on age, gender , and reproductive status. “RDA is 1.3 milligrams daily for men and 1.1 mg for women. A higher dose of 3 mg per day can help to prevent cataracts. Higher doses up to 400 mg can be used to treat migraine headaches

CHILDREN: The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) of riboflavin is 0.3 mg per day for infants up to 6 months old, 0.4 mg per day for infants 6-12 months old, 0.5 mg per day for children 1-3 years old, 0.6 mg per day for children 4-8 years old, 0.9 mg per day for children 9-13 years old, 1.3 mg per day for males 14-18 years old, and 1.0 mg per day for females 14-18.

Where to get Vitamin B2: Fortified cereals, grains, lean meat, poultry, dairy products, fortified soy/rice beverages, raw mushrooms.

8. Niacin (Vitamin B3)

According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the U.S. Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) for adults is between 16 and 18 mg daily, with a maximum intake of 35 mg daily. It is recommended that pregnant or breastfeeding women avoid supplemental niacin. Dr. Weil recommends taking 50 mg of B3 as niacinamide as part of a B-complex that contains a full spectrum of B vitamins, including thiamin, B12, and riboflavin.

Where to get Vitamin B3: Lean meats, poultry, seafood, milk; eggs, legumes, fortified breads, cereals.

9. Pantothenic Acid (Vitamin B5)

Experts recommend daily intakes of vitamin B5 recommend: Infants 0-6 months – 1.7 milligrams (mg) per day; Infants 7-12 months – 1.8 mg per day; Children 1 -3 years – 2 mg per day; Children 4-8 years – 3 mg per day; Children 9-13 years – 4 mg per day; Males and females 14 years and over – 5 mg per day; Pregnant women – 6 mg per day; Breastfeeding women – 7 mg per day.

Where to get it: Mushrooms, Eggs, Oily Fish, Beef and Beef Cuts, Chicken and Turkey, Sunflower Seeds, Avocados.

10. Pyridoxine (Vitamin B6)

The recommended daily allowance (RDA) for vitamin B6 depends on your age and sex. It ranges from 0.1 milligram (mg) for 6-month-old infants, 1.5 mg for women over 50, and 1.7 mg for men over 50. During pregnancy, the recommended RDA is 1.9 mg, and 2.0 mg during lactation.

Where to get Vitamin B6: Meat, fish, poultry, grains, cereals, bananas, green leafy vegetables, potatoes, soybeans.

11. Biotin (Vitamin B7)

There is no official recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for vitamin B7, also known as biotin. The adequate intakes (AI) for biotin are seven mcg. (micrograms) for infants 0-12 months; eight mcg. for children one to three years of age; 12 mcg. for children four to eight years of age; 20 mcg. for children nine to 13 years of age; 25 mcg. for adolescents 14 to 18 years of age; 30 mcg. for adults over 18 years of age and pregnant women; and 35 mcg. for lactating women.

Where to get Vitamin B7: Egg yolks, soybeans, whole grains, nuts, yeast.

12. Folate, Folic Acid (Vitamin B9)

The recommended daily amount of folate for adults is 400 micrograms (mcg). Adult women who are planning pregnancy or could become pregnant should be advised to get 400 to 800 mcg of folic acid a day.

Where to get Vitamin B9: Liver, yeast, leafy green vegetables, asparagus, orange juice, fortified flour, avocados; legumes.

13. Cobalamin (Vitamin B12)

According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the average daily U.S. Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) is: for people age 14 and older, 2.4 mcg; for adult and adolescent pregnant females, 2.6 mcg; for adult and adolescent lactating females, 2.8mcg.

Where to get Vitamin B12: Beef liver, Sardines, Atlantic mackerel, Lamb, Wild-caught salmon, Nutritional yeast, Feta cheese, Grass-fed beef, Cottage Cheese, Eggs.

Sources & References:
www.mayoclinic.org
www.nutri-facts.org
www.webmd.com
medlineplus.gov

Healthy Food MasterGeneral HealthB vitamins,vitamin A,vitamin b1,Vitamin B12,vitamin b2,Vitamin B3,vitamin B6,vitamin b7,vitamin C,Vitamin D,Vitamin E,Vitamin K
image source: Pixabay There are 13 essential vitamins your body needs. Those are A, C, D, E, K and the B vitamins: thiamine (B1), riboflavin (B2), niacin (B3), pantothenic acid (B5), pyroxidine (B6), biotin (B7), folate (B9) and cobalamin (B12). Recommended Dietary Allowances, or RDAs, represent the average daily dietary...
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